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Soul's Engines 

2005 Release Now Available


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A blend of acoustic soul, blues, pop-rock & bluegrass performed on vintage Hawaiian steel guitar, guitars and mandolin instruments and backed by Colorado's very best musicians!

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Soul's Engines

 

The CD includes 12 originals and a cover of Warren Hayne's (Allman Bros.) Soulshine which features a duet with Mollie O'Brien, and the cover of Cream's Politician.

John Magnie and Steve Amedee of the Subdudes grace several of the songs with their signature playing and vocals.  Rich Moore and Ross Martin provide a solid foundation and some great solos as well.

 

 

 

Go to Songlist & mp3 downloads

 

 

Soul's Engines    

Andy Volk, Writer for Acoustic Guitar Magazine & Author of The Lap Steel Guitar Book  

 

Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary defines soul as the animating and vital principle in humans - an apt description for multi-instrumentalist Dwight Mark’s musical journey through the universal landscape of the human heart. His vibrant, richly textural arrangements and soaring vocals describe a crossroads where acoustic, folk, rock, and pop meet in songs that celebrate the beauty of nature and the unbridled joy of the groove.

Dwight performs on vintage Hawaiian lap steel guitars and mandolin family instruments that have earned their dings, dents and tonal majesty from the touch of generations of musicians. Italian immigrants brought the mandolin with them to America in the late 19th century. The mandolins of that era had bowl-shaped backs, often adorned with intricately inlaid decorative elements. Michigan luthier Orville Gibson revolutionized the instrument by adapting the arched, carved top and back of the violin to the mandolin. His radical reimagining produced a mandolin design of unprecedented tone, power and visual appeal.

By the turn of the 20th century, amateur mandolin orchestras could be found throughout America playing the popular music of the day: college songs, marches, waltzes, sentimental favorites and light classical music. Thanks to the legendary Bill Monroe, the instrument became indelibly linked with bluegrass despite its continued use in other musical genres. Dwight’s mandolin was built in 1917 – the peak of the mandolin craze. In contrast to the plaintive, melancholy sound of the bowl back or the waterfall cascades of notes characteristic of bluegrass mandolin, Dwight’s lithe, muscular, playing on mandolin, mandola, and the Portuguese guitarra, hums and chugs, turning the diminutive instrument into a driving, folk-rock turbine.

At the same time the mandolin was sweeping the country, a new musical breeze was blowing from the territory of Hawaii. The year-long 1915 International Panama Pacific Exposition first introduced the Hawaiian steel guitar to the mainland United States. The lilting, yet powerful sound caught the public’s imagination and launched a thirty five-year love affair with the music of the islands. Dwight’s lap style guitars are named after their creator, Hermann C. Weissenborn, a visionary German luthier who settled in Los Angeles in the 1920s and set about creating what would become the holy grail of acoustic Hawaiian guitars. Played by sliding a steel bar along the strings, the Weissenborn features a hollow neck, which enhances the astounding dynamic range, and sustain of the instrument. Dwight adds the poetry and groove that makes Hermann’s creation speak.

Dwight's original "Island Song" speaks to the importance of cherishing our shared natural world and preserving it from extinction. The same could be said of Dwight’s devotion to these antique island-born instruments. Along with David Lindley, Ben Harper and others, Dwight’s accomplished lap slide playing reveals the beauty and surprising power of these instruments in modern pop and rock.

If a man is known by the company he keeps, Soul’s Engines surrounds Dwight with good company indeed. The Subdudes’ Steve Amedee adds his trademark New Orleans-meets-Memphis tambourine & percussion; Mollie O’Brien’s blues-inflected vocal burnishes Warren Haynes’ Soulshine; John Magnie’s accordion and Steve’s perfectly placed percussion drive a razor sharp cover of Cream’s Politician. On the twelve originals, the wash of textures and the yearning sound of Dwight’s mandolin, steel guitar and vocals cut right to the heart of the matter: the human soul as the engine that drives us to live, love and create art. Sit back, turn up the music and refuel your own soul’s engine.  


Soul’s Engines

Review by Dr. Dave Rodvold, MandoCentrics

Anyone who has listened to Dwight Mark’s music knows that it is a window to his soul. In Soul’s Engines, Dwight takes us on a tour of his hopes, dreams, past, and future, much in the tradition of his earlier album, Good Thing. Most of the songs on the new album bring out a “Yeah, I’ve been there too” response that leaves the listener feeling like they have just spent an evening with an old friend. 

The music that Dwight creates is a solid mix of sage lyrics, artful composition, and top-shelf instrumental support. In Soul’s Engines, he comes across as equal parts Jimmy Buffet and Gregg Allman – sometimes lyrical, often mournful, frequently growling. Dwight mixes the soulful sound of his vintage Weissenborn Hawaiian slide guitars with familiar timbre of his classic Gibson mandolins, backed up with an ever-changing eclectic ensemble of guitars, percussion, piano, accordion, bass, and an array of other instruments. His moods range far and wide on Soul’s Engines. From the upbeat advice in “Sometimes,” to the melancholy nostalgia of “Ninety-Five Through Nebraska,” to the tension-shedding “Wide Open Spaces,” to the passionate “Substance of Fire,” Dwight plays on the listener’s emotions. He lets us down easy though – with the relaxing concluding guitar solo of “Cade’s Cove.” 

While the album is a solid product throughout, a few songs rise above and really stir the soul. “For Granted” is a marvelous blend of the singing Weissenborn, the snarling electric mandola, Dwight’s soulful voice at its best, and hit-home lyrics. “Politician” – a cover of the old Cream tune – frames righteous indignation with a mischievous zydeco touch. “Soul Merynade” showcases the instrumental backbone of the album with a stirring interplay between the Weissenborn and mandolin worthy of Grisman & Co. on Tone Poems III. And the startling vocal intercession of Mollie O’Brien on “Soulshine” adds an edge that almost takes the breath away. Anyone who likes to take life’s back roads owes it to themselves to give Soul’s Engines a good long listen.

Musicians:

  • Dwight Mark - Lead Vocals, Weissenborn, Guitar, Electric Sitar, Electric Mandola, Mandolin, Mandola, Mandocello, Mini-telecaster slide guitar, Dobro, Lapsteel & Guitarras

  • Ross Martin (currently on tour with Matt Flinner, Drew Emmit and Mollie O'Brien) - Electric & Acoustic Guitar

  • John Magnie of the Subdudes - Accordian, Piano, Organ & Vocals

  • Steve Amedee of the Subdudes - Tambourine, Percussion, Vocals

  • Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals

  • Rich Moore of Pete Wernick's Live Five, Celeste Krenz & Mollie O'Brien - Bass

  • Rob Anderlik of Sunny Side Up - Scheerhorn Resonator Guitar

  • Micah Lundy of Zebra Junction - Small Portuguese Guitarra

  • Mollie O’Brien - Vocals

  • Jeremy Lawton of Big Head Todd and the Monsters - Hammond Organ & Piano

  • Brian McRae (currently on tour with Mindy Smith) - Drums

  • Charlie Provenza -Mandolin

  • Eric Thorin of Open Road - Upright Bass

  • Rich Zimmerman of Slipstream - Mandolin

  • Ernie Martinez - Banjo

  • Ed Contreras - Percussion

  • Gene Libbea (former Nashville Bluegrass Band and two time Grammy Winner) - Upright Bass

  • Mark Oblinger (formerly of Firefall) - Vocals

The Songs - Click on the mp3s to listen

Sometimes 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight – Vocal, acoustic & electric guitar & mandolin

Rich Moore – Bass

John Magnie – Piano

Steve Amedee – Tambourine & percussion

Jeremy Lawton - Hammond Organ  

 

Download Sometimes.mp3  (6 Megs)

Rich, John, Dwight & Steve at Immersive Studios

MaryLynn Gillaspie Photography 

For Granted 

Written by Dwight Mark & Celeste Krenz 

 

Dwight – Vocal, Weissenborn & electric mandola

Rich Moore – Bass

Brian McRae – Drums

Jeremy Lawton - Organ

John Magnie, Steve Amedee, Mollie O’Brien, Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals

 

Download Forgranted.mp3

Edge of the Sea 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight – Vocal, acoustic guitar & mini-tele slide guitar

Ross Martin - Electric guitar
Rich Moore - Bass
John Magnie - Piano, organ & vocals
Steve Amedee - Drums, percussion & vocals
Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals

 

Download EdgeoftheSea.mp3

Politician 

Written by Jack Bruce and Pete Brown

 

Dwight – Vocal, Weissenborn, mandola solo, mandolins, mandolas & mandocello

Rich Moore – Bass

Ross Martin - Guitar

John Magnie – Accordian

Steve Amedee – Tambourine & percussion

Charlie Provenza – End Mandolin Solo  

 

Download Politician.mp3

 

Soul Merynade (instrumental)

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight –Weissenborn & mandolin

Eric Thorin – Bass

Ross Martin – Guitar

 

Download Soulmerynade.mp3

 

Soulshine 

Written by Warren Haynes

 

Dwight - Vocal & Weissenborn
Mollie O'Brien - Vocal
Eric Thorin - Bass
Ross Martin -Guitar
Rich Zimmerman - Mandolin
 
Download Soulshine.mp3

 

Wide Open Spaces 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight – Vocal & mandolin

Gene Libea – Bass

Ross Martin – Guitar

Rob Anderlik - Dobro

Ernie Martinez - Banjo

Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals

 

Download Wideopenspaces.mp3

Never Question 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal, guitar & Weissenborn
Ross Martin - Electric guitar
Rich Moore - Bass
Jeremy Lawton - Piano
Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals
 
Download Neverquestion.mp3
 

Ninety-five Through Nebraska 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal, guitar, dobro, lapsteel
Rich Moore - Bass
Brian McRae - Drums
Jeremy Lawton - Organ
Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals
 
Download Ninetyfive.mp3

Island Song 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal, Portuguese guitarras
Rich Moore - Bass
John Magnie - Accordian & vocals
Steve Amedee - Tambourine, percussion & vocals
Micah Lundy - Small Portuguese Guitarra 
Ed Cantraras - Percussion
 
 

 

Black in the Blues 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal & dobro
Rich Moore - Bass
Brian McRae - Drums
Jeremy Lawton -  Piano

 

Take Another Turn 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal, guitar, handclaps
Rich Moore - Bass
John Magnie - Accordian & vocals
Steve Amedee - Percussion & vocals
Brian McCrae - Drums
Ross Martin - Electric guitar
Jeremy Lawton - Organ
Cheryl & Andy Winston - Vocals
Mollie O'Brien - Vocals
Amber Abbas - Handclaps
Maxine McKinzie - Handclaps

Substance of Fire 

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight - Vocal, acoustic guitar, mandolin, electric sitar
Ross Martin - Electric guitar

Rich Moore - Bass
Brian McRae - Drums
Mark Oblinger - Vocal

 

 

Download Fire.mp3

Cades Cove (instrumental)

Written by Dwight Mark

 

Dwight – Guitar